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Won’t You Celebrate with Us?

June is a prodigious month to celebrate Lucille Clifton’s life and work. Born on this day, June 27, in 1936, her singular poetry spans over fifty years. Clifton’s posthumous collection, How To Carry Water: Selected Poems Of Lucille Clifton, edited by Aracelis Girmay (BOA, 2020) releases in paperback this Fall 2021. Lucille Clifton’s many accolades and awards include the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Frost Medal, and an Emmy Award. BOA Editions published nine books by Lucille Clifton, including Quilting, Mercy, Voices, and the following extraordinary collections. Blessing The Boats won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2000. Next:...

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February Review Roundup

BOA Editions is proud to present nine reviews of forthcoming releases and recent backlist titles released in the month of February. Read the reviews linked below for a sneak peek into some of our upcoming and recently published books!

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Little Infinite interviews BOA Publisher Peter Conners

BOA Publisher Peter Conners sat down with Stephen Sparks earlier this year for an interview for Ingram's Little Infinite poetry newsletter. We invite you to enjoy this behind-the-scenes look at BOA Editions through their conversation.

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Now Playing: a Spotify Soundtrack for Rail

Hello readers! Today is the official publication of Rail by Kai Carlson-Wee, and Kai sent us a special playlist of songs that inspired his work.  Listen to the playlist on Spotify and read Kai's liner notes below. Enjoy! A note from Kai Carlson-Wee: Most of the poems in RAIL were started while I was traveling. They typically began as scraps of sound, lyrics I jotted down, images, impressions, which I then cobbled together later on. Obviously the poems I was reading would fuel the sound, but just as often the music I was listening to would influence the writing. The way I listen to music is sort...

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Sky Country in the Spotlight

The poems in Sky Country have resonated with readers of all backgrounds. Drawing on both the real and imagined experiences of her own family, Christine Kitano fills a gap in America's history by giving a voice to immigrant women whose stories have been forgotten by time.

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