Shopping Cart
#BOATurns40 - SHARE YOUR STORY TO WIN A NEW CHAPBOOK BY LI-YOUNG LEE!

BOA Blog

← Back to All Posts

Rain Taxi compares 'Theophobia' with works of Augustine

Theophobia Rain Taxi Review of Books is calling Bruce Beasley's Theophobia "inventive," an "important contemporary addition to poetic wrestling with the religious," compared with the works of Augustine. Among other praises, reviewer Spencer Dew marvels at the creative manner by which Beasley addresses the divine while simultaneously speaking to such topics and objects as Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite of the feline digestive tract, or a TiVo Customer Service telephone line. How does he do it? "[Beasley] manages to keep the reader connected by stitching such abstract and conceptual musings to the recognizable and known. Voicemail messages warning of call volume, popups containing password reset prompts, the vernacular idioms by which we express ourselves in a stuttering resistance of expression: Beasley uses these to gesture at broader philosophical concerns." Live person, please. Because some days being feels experimental, randomized, placebo-suspect, double-blind, some voice inside the hissing keeps saying to us (robotic, anachronistic): Reenter the code. "This is a book that wrestles with religious forms as well as religious notions, considering religious practice and experience in relation to current-day concerns. This includes not only the putting of lines on paper, but also waiting for customer service or meditating on the grand design of the Toxoplasma gondii lifecycle... what sets Theophobia apart—as a thick, varied, and always thoughtful exercise—is considering such a phenomena as a religious task, revealing of something essential to our understanding of God, as Augustine argued in relation to vipers and worms... Beasley casts a broad net, dredging deep in this important contemporary addition to poetic wrestling with the religious." Click here to read the full review of Theophobia. Click here to purchase Theophobia, today.  

0 comments


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published