Shopping Cart

BOA Blog

← Back to All Posts

storySouth Review calls True Faith a "stunner"

Ira Sadoff's True Faith revolves around the act of searching. In a collection which the speaker asks questions of his world - "neighbors, friends, the reader, and the gods" - storySouth Review calls Sadoff a searcher of "whatever he can get." Sadoff digs deeply at the meaning of human relationships with the world at large, and then digs deeper still. According to storySouth Reviewer Shawn Delgado, "These poems can be brief reflections or lengthy meditations. Some feel intimate and personal while others unleash a political fury." Throughout this collection are moments of intimate introspection and bold interaction with the world - a struggle to reconcile the internal and the external. How does one understand the self, others, and the two together? Ultimately, how does one make meaning? "And rarely does a speaker feel so complete on the page. He [Sadoff] operates with a clear confidence of a man who trusts his memory, yet is tempered with humility and a pointed self-awareness that includes an acute awareness of irony and humor as the profane and sacred coexist, not on the same planet or even city, but in the same room. There’s an honest volatility that makes these poems explode off the page, quickly leaping from lyric grace to a swagger and then back to a peaceful confession..." The truth that Sadoff searches for is ridden with struggle: "Early in the book, the speaker suggests 'What a well the self would be/ if we could find it.'" Sadoff displays "a raving curiosity that lets him ask questions like 'How can I embrace the spell-makers...the gods who should have looked after me?' without ever sounding dejected or wronged, without losing the energy to continue the search." "The book culminates in a catharsis and a faith found in something as flawed as ourselves, both out of necessity and a cautious optimism...Folks, this book is a stunner."


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published