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Advance-copies of Entire Fall 2012 Season - NOW in the BOA Bookstore!

While BOA's fall 2012 titles aren't scheduled for official release until 1-3 months from now, BOA just received a thrilling shipment yesterday of the final three titles of the season: Theophobia, Passwords Primeval: 20 American Poets in their Own Words, and Diadem: Selected Poems! Do you know what that means? You can go to the BOA Bookstore TODAY to claim your copies of any and all of the long-awaited fall 2012 titles, including The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 and To Keep Love Blurry!  Each of the titles are absolutely breathtaking, and we at BOA are so proud to finally hold them in our hands - and to get them into yours! Here's an overview of BOA's fall 2012 season: The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 Edited by Kevin Young and Michael S. Glaser Foreword by Toni Morrison Afterword by Kevin Young Lucille_smaller Called "the most important book of poetry to appear in years" by Publishers Weekly, this landmark volume is the culmination of a 40-year career by one of America’s most revered poets, combining all of Lucille Clifton’s published collections with more than 65 previously unpublished poems. The unpublished pieces feature early poems from 1965-1969, a collection-in-progress entitled Book of Days, and a poignant selection of final poems. An insightful Foreword by Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison, and a comprehensive Afterword by noted poet Kevin Young, frame Clifton’s lifetime body of work, providing a definitive statement about this major American poet’s career. This landmark volume is a must-have for all of Clifton’s fans - past, present, and future. To Keep Love Blurry poems by Craig Morgan Teicher ToKeepLoveBlurry_smaller2 Inspired by Robert Lowell’s Life Studies, Craig Morgan Teicher’s To Keep Love Blurry is an exploration of the charged and troubled spaces between intimately connected people: husbands and wives, parents and children, writers and readers. These poems include sonnets, villanelles, and long poems, as well as two poetic prose pieces, all meditating on the relationship between truth and art. As a son becomes a husband and then a father, Teicher expertly probes a life recast as poetry, with poems that long to leap into the lives of their subjects. Library Journal says of the collection: "The majority of poems in this new work from Teicher… employ form in the best sense of the word– as a frame, not a crutch… When at his best, Teicher’s poems are formal and–as a welcome bonus– amusing." Theophobia poems by Bruce Beasley Theophobia_smaller Bruce Beasley’s Theophobia is the latest volume in his ongoing spiritual meditation, which forms a kind of postmodern devotional poetry in a reinvention of the tradition of John Donne, George Herbert, Emily Dickinson, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and T. S. Eliot. The book is structured around a series of poems called "Pilgrim’s Deviations" and it forms a deviating pilgrimage through science, history, politics, and popular culture. Beasley interrogates the theological, metaphysical, scientific, and political worlds of our time in a continually disrupted catechism, a "catechismus interruptus." A Publishers Weekly Starred Review says of Theophobia: "Beasley outdoes his five prior collections with this spiky, thoughtful, elaborate, sometimes scary, sometimes funny set of verse essays, riffs, and meditations on the idea of a Christian creator-god, and on ideas from evolutionary and molecular biology about how life comes to be… Yet it's never just play: he wants answers, from divinity or from DNA, even if he believes that he will not get them, and so his variable, friable, unbalanced verse lines can morph into prayer… Careful, sympathetic attention will produce pleasure in Beasley's collisions between curiosity and doubt, as the newest oddities of the life sciences, and the oddest words he can find, crash into dark fears and grapple with ancient questions." Passwords Primeval: 20 American Poets in Their Own Words interviews by Tony Leuzzi PasswordsPrimeval_smaller Passwords Primeval sets aside the artificial boundaries of poetry “schools” and “movements” to cut to the art of the matter. Tony Leuzzi’s astounding knowledge of poetry draws new insights from such luminaries as Billy Collins, Gerald Stern, Jane Hirshfield, Patricia Smith, and Martín Espada. These new interviews offer a candid look at craft, inspiration, and living as a poet; they provide insights into the poets and their poems, without compromising their mystery. This eclectic roster of poets is a revelation of the enormous breadth of American poetry. Diadem: Selected Poems poems by Marosa di Giorgio translated from the Spanish by Adam Giannelli Diadem_smaller Marosa di Giorgio has one of the most distinct and recognizable voices in Latin American poetry. Her surreal and fable-like prose poems invite comparison to Kafka, Cortázar, and even contemporary American poets Russell Edson and Charles Simic; but di Giorgio’s voice, imagery, and themes—childhood, the Uruguayan countryside, a perception of the sacred—are her own. Previously written off as “the mad woman of Uruguayan letters,” di Giorgio’s reputation has blossomed in recent years. Get your advance-copies of these BOA books from the bookstore today!

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