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November 2013
 
In the title poem to her National Book Award-winning collection Blessing the Boats, Lucille Clifton wrote:
                                           
                                             may you kiss
                                            the wind then turn from it
                                            certain that it will
                                            love your back 
 
Buoyed by the power of poetry, it is fair to say that BOA is sailing into 2014 with two new major awards acting as the wind at our backs. In October, during a gala ceremony in Washington, D.C., The Collected Poems of Lucille Clifton 1965-2010 was awarded the 2013 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Poetry. The Hurston/Wright Foundation established the Legacy Award as “the first national award presented to published writers of African descent by the national community of Black writers.” On the very same day, in New York City, BOA author Jillian Weise was awarded the James Laughlin Award from the Academy of American Poets for her collection The Book of Goodbyes. The Laughlin Award is the only national award given for a second book of poetry and is widely considered one of the most prestigious awards in the country. It was no surprise then that only one week later Publishers Weekly named The Book of Goodbyes as one of the Best Books of 2013.
                    
Awards and recognition are thrilling, but readers of BOA books know that each title we produce is a winner in its own right. Our 2014 selections offer a diverse range of voices, perspectives, and a variety of poetic styles that sustain BOA’s 38-year legacy of publishing the best poetry and fiction being written today. Just as our authors’ powerful words and accomplishments provide the wind in our sails, it is you – our faithful BOA supporters – who provide the boat upon which we sail. With book sales funding less than half of BOA’s budget, we depend on your support to sustain our mission of “identifying, cultivating, and publishing both new and established poets and selecting authors of unique literary talent.” Without you, none of BOA’s celebrated work in publishing would be possible. On behalf of our board, staff, authors, and readers, we thank you for your invaluable support as we sail into the future.

BOA Editions offers donors of $125 (or more) the option to be named as a contributor to books of their choice. For each $125 contributed, your name will be listed in the back of a book for our upcoming season.

A $1,000 contribution will be acknowledged in all titles slated to publish in a given year, or up to 10 titles over the course of a 12 month period.

You may also specify that your donation remain anonymous, or you may wish to make an acknowledgement in honor/memory of someone. For example: Jane Jones, in memory of her father Samuel L. Jones or John Smith, in honor of his daughter Sally Smith.

Below are descriptions of the 2014 titles. Please help keep contemporary poetry in print by doing what you can to support these books.

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2014 Titles

Revising the Storm  Winner of the A. Poulin, Jr. Poetry Prize -This debut collection by Cave Canem fellow Geffrey Davis burrows under the surface of gender, addiction, recovery, clumsy love, bitterness, and faith. The tones explored—tender, comic, wry, tragic—interrogate male subjectivity and privilege, as they examine their “embarrassed desires” for familial connection, sexual love, compassion, and repair. Revising the Storm speaks to the sons and daughters affected by the drug/crack epidemic of the ’80s and addresses issues of masculinity and its importance in family.

All You Ask For is Longing  by Sean Thomas Dougherty. For more than 20 years Dougherty has negotiated between modernist and avant-garde writing and more populist traditions that extend back to Walt Whitman. Selecting from the best of eight previous collections, this New and Selected reveals the powerful arc and development of Dougherty’s writing and establishes him as a voice of dissent for the future.

The Keys to the Jail by Keetje Kuipers continues Elizabeth Bishop’s tradition of the art of losing, but delves deeper into the self-accusatory nature of loss and blame. Asking the question of who is to blame for all we’ve lost, Kuipers’ new collection calls us to reexamine the harsh words of failed love, the aging of a once-beautiful body, our own voracious desires. 

The World Shared Translated from polish by Piotr Florczyk and Boris Dralyuk. Dariusz SoÅ�nicki’s poems open our eyes to the sublime just beneath the surface of the mundane: a train carrying children away from their parents for summer vacation turns into a ravenous monster; a meal at a Chinese restaurant inspires a surreal journey through the zodiac; a malfunctioning printer is a reminder of the ghosts that haunt us no matter where we find ourselves. 

The Tao of Humiliation  stories by Lee Upton.  Alternately chilling, funny, devastating, and hopeful, these 17 stories examine the course of humiliation, introducing us to a theater critic who winds up in a hot tub with the actress he routinely savages in reviews; a biographer who struggles to discover why a novelist stopped writing; a student who contends with her predatory professor; and the startling scenario of the last satyr meeting his last woman. 

The Chair  by Richard Garcia. Praised by Nobel Prize Winner Octavio Paz for his “emotion…verbal economy [and] tone (the words react—the images are seen)," Garcia’s poetry has received numerous accolades including a Cohen Award from Ploughshares, a Pushcart Prize, and the Georgetown Review Poetry Prize.

Copia  by Erica Meitner “Meitner’s poetry often engages both the markings and ephemera of contemporary life, and her poems frequently utilize a narrative frame.” –Poetry Foundation. Meitner is the winner of the 2009 National Poetry Series competition, has received the Robert Dana-Anhinga Prize for Poetry, and has had numerous fellowships.

In A Landscape by John Gallaher.  An American poet and assistant professor of English at Northwest Missouri State University, and co-editor of The Laurel Review, Gallaher won the Levis Poetry Prize in 2005 and has been published in numerous anthologies including Boston Review, Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, Field, jubilat, The Journal, Ploughshares,  andThe Best American Poetry 2008. This is Gallaher's second book with BOA, his first being Your Father On the Train of Ghosts (Boa Editions 2011.)

The Secret of Hoa Sen. by Nguyen Phan Que Mai. An award-winning Vietnamese writer, journalist and translator, Que Mai’s recent poems give voices to the disadvantaged people of Vietnam. She writes about all people including street sellers, garbage collectors, war victims, and rice farmers. 

This debut collection by Cave Canem fellow Geffrey Davis burrows under the surface of gender, addiction, recovery, clumsy love, bitterness, and faith. The tones explored—tender, comic, wry, tragic—interrogate male subjectivity and privilege, as they examine their
“embarrassed desires” for familial connection, sexual love, compassion, and repair. Revising the Storm speaks to the sons and daughters affected by the drug/crack epidemic of the ’80s and addresses issues of masculinity and its importance in family.This debut collection by Cave Canem fellow Geffrey Davis burrows under the surface of gender, addiction, recovery, clumsy love, bitterness, and faith. The tones explored—tender, comic, wry, tragic—interrogate male subjectivity and privilege, as they examine their“embarrassed desires” for familial connection, sexual love, compassion, and repair. Revising the Storm speaks to the sons and daughters affected by the drug/crack epidemic of the ’80s and addresses issues of masculinity and its importance in family