May 29, 2012

Publishers Weekly Reviews 'To Keep Love Blurry'

This month in Publishers Weekly, Craig Morgan Teicher’s upcoming (and highly anticipated) poetry collection To Keep Love Blurry, out on September 11, was featured. Teicher, a young writer, has already published two previous works (including Cradle Book) and is also poetry editor and director of digital operations at PW. The review praises To Keep Love Blurry, saying that it “risks most everything poetry can risk.”  Robert Lowell, the famous poet (often considered a father of the craft), is a familiar inspiration for Teicher, and is ever present in much of his new book. Through his poems, “the spirits of dead parents mix with a spouse and children and colleagues, and …Robert Lowell… presides over this entire volume in a ghostly fashion that should get Harold Bloom’s attention.”

Grief, doubt, and struggle for present-day human beings are illuminated themes in Teicher’s new book. PW acknowledges that “marriage and fatherhood wreak agony from Teicher, as does the pain of having lost his own mother early, the young poet-to-be cast into the world groping for language—’Her death was like waking up to fried/ food cooking on another family’s stove/ in another life where no one cried.’” These ideas of tension and heartache between intimately connected people are alive and dancing through the lines of his tight sonnets, a perfect villanelle, and a moving prose memoir.

See PW‘s review of To Keep Love Blurry here.

Get excited for this new collection — just a few more months! Can’t stand the wait? Check out some of Teicher’s other work here to hold you over.

Craig Morgan Teicher. BOA Author.

Craig Morgan Teicher. BOA Author.

One Response to “Publishers Weekly Reviews ‘To Keep Love Blurry’”

  1. February 20, 2013 at 2:33 pm, New Title Preview: To Keep Love Blurry | Rochester Arts | Rochester Democrat and Chronicle said:

    [...] Love Blurry into the hands of readers. The book has received praise and reviews from such places as Publishers Weekly, Vanity Fair, Library Journal, and The Rumpus, which compares Teicher with such literary [...]

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